Center News

Kansas City Royals' Billy Butler takes 47th Hutch Award

Designated hitter to be honored at Feb. 1 luncheon; Hall of Famer Cal Ripken Jr. to deliver keynote

Jan. 9, 2012
Billy Butler

While in Seattle to accept the 47th annual Hutch Award, Major League Baseball's Billy Butler will visit Center labs and meet with children and teachers at the Hutch School.

Courtesy Kansas City Royals

Major League Baseball's Billy Butler, designated hitter for the Kansas City Royals, will receive the 47th annual Hutch Award at the annual fundraising luncheon Wednesday, Feb. 1 at Safeco Field. Baseball Hall of Famer Cal Ripken Jr. will deliver the keynote address.

Register for the luncheon online. Guests are asked to make a minimum $150 donation to benefit the Hutchinson Center's early cancer detection research.

While in Seattle, Butler will visit Center's labs and meet with children and teachers at the Hutch School.

Butler, a 25-year-old native of Orange Park, Fla., made his major league debut with the team in 2007, having been selected by the Royals right out of high school in the first round of the 2004 draft. Despite his desire to play on the field, last year Butler was given full-time duty as the Royals' designated hitter, and he has become one of the most consistent hitters in the American League.

Off the field, Butler and his wife, Katie, started the Hit-It-A-Ton campaign to help feed disadvantaged families in the Kansas City area. The Butlers teamed up with local businesses to provide donations for each home run and double Butler hits—to date, generating more than $200,000 for food banks and a community kitchen.

The Hutch Award is given each year to a player exemplifies the honor, courage and dedication of baseball great Fred Hutchinson, for whom the Center is named. For more information about the Hutch Award, including a list of past recipients, visit www.fhcrc.org/hutchaward.

Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center is a world leader in research to prevent, detect and treat cancer and other life-threatening diseases.